Japan’s retirees offer solution to labor shortage conundrum For Eiji and Kumiko Ishikawa, the working day starts as early as 5 a.m. Having loaded the requisite equipment into their van, they set off for their first job of the day, a 14-story high-rise in western Tokyo. They unload mops and brushes, roll out the hoses,…

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About the author

Rob is a Tokyo-based British journalist and photographer whose work has appeared in publications around the globe. He has worked for international news agencies and contributed to numerous TV documentaries and books. He is also author of a book about the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster. He has a Masters degree in journalism and teaches a media-related course at Sophia University.

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Rob is a Tokyo-based British journalist and photographer whose work has appeared in publications around the globe. He has worked for international news agencies and contributed to numerous TV documentaries and books. He is also author of a book about the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster. He has a Masters degree in journalism and teaches a media-related course at Sophia University.