A Tunisian woman’s journey to freedom and the right to be herself in Japan It was on a basketball court that Nahed* finally knew she was safe.  “A few days after coming to Japan, I wanted to play basketball,” she says. “It was 11:30pm and there were two courts. Five or six guys were playing…

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About the author

Joan Bailey is a freelance writer living in Japan where her work focuses on food, farming, and farmers markets. Her articles and essays can be found in The Japan Times, Modern Farmer, Civil Eats, and Permaculture Magazine. She has contributed to several anthologies and her work has been recognized with various awards in Japan and in the US.

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Joan Bailey is a freelance writer living in Japan where her work focuses on food, farming, and farmers markets. Her articles and essays can be found in The Japan Times, Modern Farmer, Civil Eats, and Permaculture Magazine. She has contributed to several anthologies and her work has been recognized with various awards in Japan and in the US.