Friday, March 24, 2023
This article has not yet been translated into English.
The pandemic has pushed women even further to the margins in Japan, exposing the systemic discrimination, as well as the lack of appropriate public services, especially for struggling women.
When C.I. Desert landed at the Narita International Airport in 2018, he stepped into a new life. Young, educated, and multilingual, he fled home, family and a teaching career in Cameroon, which was rife with civil unrest. The reason for choosing Japan, he says, was simple: “In 2018, if you typed ‘10 safest countries in the world,’ you saw Japan.”
Ryota Kuriyama couldn’t care less about winning or losing, let alone athletic competition. But he does believe in fair play, in recognizing effort, in people. However, the blind musician and acupuncture instructor from Yokohama City came to understand the...
Gloria Onyekweli came to Japan just before Christmas in 2006, claiming asylum from her native Nigeria. She left her homeland after she said her fiancé, a political activist caught up in the Biafran separatist movement, was killed by the...
National campaign seeks to end violence against women  There’s an almost dispassionate matter-of-factness in the way Risa Tanaka describes how she was tortured by her husband.  One of the methods he favored, she says, was to act as a police...
There is little that Nahoko Takato has not seen or experienced. Seeking a change from her work operating a karaoke bar in her hometown of Chitose, Hokkaido, she left in 2000 to work with hospice patients in India, Thailand...

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