Friday, December 3, 2021
This article has not yet been translated into English.
Labour Union fights for change for Japanese Public Health Care Workers Sachie Akasugi (not her real name) is beyond exhausted. A worker at a public health center in Osaka, Akasugi and her colleagues are part of Japan’s first line of...
This article has not yet been translated into English.
Due to the spread of coronavirus, people who are in vulnerable positions such as the impoverished and those living on the street, are finding themselves in a pinch situation. In Tokyo, which is one of the target municipalities of Japan's state of  emergency declaration, there are critical problems with finding housing for such people, many of whom are directly affected by the closures of Internet cafes and and shared rooms for welfare guardians due to the spread of Covid-19.
Three long-term nursing care helpers have taken the state to court, citing  workplace violations of the Labor Standards Act and  wage theft. The workers, who are women in their 60s from Tokyo and Fukushima, filed the lawsuit with the Tokyo...
As radiation levels fell, public sector workers evacuated during the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster were ordered to return and push on with decontamination work. But was it as “safe” as they were led to believe?  As decontamination work proceeded in...
Pay dispute shines spotlight on supply chains and justice ​ A factory responsible for producing products for retail chain Uniqlo has closed, leaving 4,000 workers out on the streets without work or any severance pay.  Indonesian national Wani Rena Napishul was...
An interview with former firefighter: Yukio Takayama The high-pitched sound of the dosimeter echoed in the darkness, and hyper-rescue personnel who had been dispatched from Tokyo confirmed their radiation doses. On that day, March 18, 2011, the world watched on...
When C.I. Desert landed at the Narita International Airport in 2018, he stepped into a new life. Young, educated, and multilingual, he fled home, family and a teaching career in Cameroon, which was rife with civil unrest. The reason for choosing Japan, he says, was simple: “In 2018, if you typed ‘10 safest countries in the world,’ you saw Japan.”
The murder of an elderly homeless woman in Tokyo in November was another reminder of the vulnerability of people living on the streets, even in one of the world’s safest cities. Misako Obayashi, 64, was hit on the head, apparently with a bag of rocks, while sitting at a bus stop near Sasazuka Station in the early hours of Nov 16. Her alleged killer, Kazuhito Yoshida, 46, reportedly offered her money to move elsewhere and became enraged when she refused.  

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